If space is absolute no matter the frame of reference but time is relative based on the frame of reference of the observer, should quantum superposition be interpreted as a particle in 2 or more places/states in time simultaneously instead of space?

Is space absolute?

Space, the word, has different meanings depending on context.

When you talk about Space and Time together you are talking in the context of dimensions.

Dimensions are abstract frameworks / models, formulated in standard units, that we overlay an aspect of reality in order to calibrate and index that particular reality.

[There are many many dimensions, many aspects of reality, that are calibrated in standard units. Dimensions of weight, mass, density, radioactivity, heat, colour, brightness, sound volume, tone, pitch etc etc.]

All dimensions are relative. And all dimensions are abstract ( eg the dimension of temperature is abstract, heat the underlying reality). And all dimensions must be, obviously, reference-frame specific.

Space (in the context of dimensions) is the dimension of relative position. The XYZ axis, the three sub-dimensions (vectors) of height, breadth and depth, simply determine relative position. And we calibrate in units of, say, miles, or centimetres etc.

And Time is the dimension of change. We calibrate change (rate) in units if time, as in xxxx PER HOUR. The ‘per hour’ or ‘per second’ etc is the calibration of change.

So Time is always used in conjuncture with another dimension to give that other dimension a ‘rate’ of change.

So, Space is the dimension of (relative) position. Time is the dimension of change. Merge the two and you get SpaceTime the dimension of changing position aka Motion.

Spacetime is the dimension of (constant) motion. [‘Constant’ motion (eg miles per hour) because dimensions are reference frame specific…for changing motion (acceleration) we need spacetime-time (miles per hour per hour) and for increasing acceleration its spacetime-time-time (eg miles per hour per hour per hour) etc]

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Time is not a dimension. How can the intelligent physics students confront physics professors delusions of time as a dimension?

Time clearly is a dimension.

Do you know what dimensions are? They are abstract measurement, calibration and indexing frameworks. They are how we measure, calibrate and index an underlying subject.

Example1:- Temperature is the dimension of heat. Temperature is how we measure, calibrate and index heat. Temperature is abstract; heat is real.

Example 2. Space (a word with multiple meanings) in this context is how we measure, calibrate and index relative position.Hence xyz axis. Space (in this context) is abstract, position is real.

And Time (in this context…time is also a word with multiple meanings) is the dimension of change. Time is how we measure change rate.

For example. A change of position is measured in, say, miles.

The rate of change of position, aka motion, is measured in miles PER HOUR. The ‘per hour’ bit is the dimension known as Time.

Time is hence the dimension of change. Time calibrates change. Time (in this context) is abstract. Change is real.

(Btw..if Space is the dimension of relative position, Time the dimension of change, hence Spacetime is the dimension of changing position aka Motion.)

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Sir! Is time constant?

Sir,

Time (in this context) is a measurement framework, calibrated in standard units (e.g. hours). It calibrates change (hence ’rate’) So, yes, Time is constant. It is also reference-frame specific.

Space too (in this context) is also a measurement framework, calibrated in standard units (eg miles). It calibrates relative position.

Spacetime hence calibrates changing position ie. Constant Motion (constant because all calibrations are reference-frame specific). It is calibrated in miles per hour.

Spacetime-time calibrates constant acceleration eg miles per hour per hour.

Spacetime-time-time calibrates constantly changing acceleration. Miles per hour per hour per hour.

And so on.

That makes spacetime complex.

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